Pre-Engineering

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In one form or another, engineering has existed since ancient times. As Archimedes once said, “Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.” Currently, engineering is an extremely customizable discipline that combines math, science, and humanities. Engineers take the rules of the world and create new products and processes to make life easier and more efficient. Engineers play a vital role in creating growth, driving innovation, and sustaining infrastructure.

Through collaborative relationships with various university and college institutions, Holy Cross College students are able to attain a strong academic foundation in the sciences and a cross-disciplinary education in the core curriculum to prepare them for a transition into four-year undergraduate programs in engineering. By working closely with the college’s science faculty, students can identify undergraduate programs that meet their interest at local or regional colleges or universities. Enrolling in this program allows students to explore their interest in engineering while making significant academic progress towards enrolling in an engineering program.

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Program Focus


science.engineeringThe pre-engineering academic program is designed for students considering a major in engineering. This academic track allows students at Holy Cross to enroll in a series of courses which would facilitate their transition into an engineering program. Through the college’s participation in the Northern Indiana Consortium of Education (N.I.C.E.), students are able to enroll in upper-level physics or engineering courses at Saint Mary’s College or Purdue University Polytechnic Institute (South Bend).

The pre-engineering academic program consists of two separate tracks. To qualify for the one-year track, students must demonstrate readiness for college-level calculus as shown by previous course work and placement examination or, for incoming students, have earned a high school GPA at least 3.25 with a 25 ACT or 1160 SAT score.

The two-year track is recommended for students who do not academically qualify for the one-year track, or who are considering engineering as part of a multi-discipline course study.

One-Year Track Requirements



Sample of Courses Required for Track

Year 1 Fall Semester Credits
MATH 151 Calculus I 4
CHEM 151 Chemistry I 4
PHYS 151 Physics I 4
General Education Credits 6
Year 1 Spring Semester Credits
MATH 152 Calculus II 4
CHEM 152 Chemistry II 4
PHYS 152 Physics II 4
General Education Credits 6
Total Required for Track 36

**Students must demonstrate readiness for college-level calculus as shown by previous course work and placement examination or, for incoming students, have earned a high school GPA at least 3.25 with a 25 ACT or 1160 SAT score.

Two-Year Track Requirements


Sample of Courses Required for Track

Year 1 Fall Semester Credits
MATH 125 Pre-Calculus 3
CHEM 151 Chemistry I 4
General Education Credits 9
Year 1 Spring Semester Credits
ENGR 101 Introduction to Math for Engineering Applications 4
CHEM 152 Chemistry II 4
General Education Credits 9
Year 2 Fall Semester Credits
MATH 151 Calculus I 4
PHYS 151 Physics I 4
Computer Science or Science Elective with Lab* 4
General Education Credits 6
Year 2 Spring Semester Credits
MATH 152 Calculus II 4
PHYS 152 Physics II 4
Computer Science or Science Elective with Lab* 4
General Education Credits 6
Total Required for Track 69

*Students have option to enroll in courses at Holy Cross, Saint Mary’s College, or Purdue University Polytechnic Institute–South Bend

Faculty


br jesus 2
Br. Jesus Alonso, C.S.C., Ph.D.
Chair, Division of Natural Sciences
Vice President for Strategic Initiatives

While at St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX, I was awarded a Presidential Award in my last year as an undergraduate. I have a doctorate in microbiology, and I have worked with Ebola and Marburg viruses as a researcher at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio, TX, under the direction of Jean L. Patterson. In 2013, I published two peer-reviewed articles on my virus research.

When working with students, my main goal is to challenge them to become problem solvers. Facts in all fields of study are in continuous evolution, and students therefore must understand that texts provide the basis for future discovery. As an educator, I require my students to think about contemporary challenges in science which in turn would help them understand how they too can become contributors to scientific thought and understanding.

Martin Sulkanen
Martin Sulkanen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics

My Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University led me to a post-doctoral fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a career in astrophysics with companies and organizations such as NASA Marshall Flight Center, Michigan Research and Development Center, and Leidos, Inc. Because of my lifelong fascination with the profound consequences of the basic principles of physics on our universe, I have studied binary star systems, galactic radio jets, and worked on NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory Project Science Team.

As a professor of physics and mathematics, I encourage my students to develop an intuitive understanding for physics to guide the understanding of further mathematical analysis: “don’t get lost in the equations!” My students have gone on to a variety of careers in places such as at Yale University, the International Space Station and the the US Patent & Trademark Office.

Yuhui Lu
Yuhui Lu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry

The study of chemistry is necessary for students who want to pursue a career in natural science, medical science, and engineering. It also helps liberal art students to improve their reasoning skills, understand scientific methodology, and gain deeper insight between human-nature relationships. I challenge all my students, regardless of background, to engage in logic, diligence, and self-discipline.

I have earned Ph.D.s in both chemistry and electrical engineering. I use this combination of disciplines to research nanoelectronics and single molecular devices with colleagues at the University of Notre Dame. I have also been a principal investigator of grants with the National Science Foundation, and undergraduate research supervisor. I am currently pursuing a variety of research opportunities for Holy Cross students.

John Cybulskis
Assistant Professor of Mathematics

I have enjoyed teaching all age ranges of students, and I am proud of the successes that they have had. I love to take science out of the classroom, and in that pursuit, I have been a mentor/trainer for the Mechanical Universe Program, a mentor/trainer in a comprehensive conceptual curriculum for physics, and the Indiana Finalist for the NASA Teacher in Space program.

I encourage my students to be open minded and intensely curious, without fearing investing work to gain knowledge. The world will never be less mathematical, but Mother Nature is willing to share her secrets with those willing to learn.

Huiyuan Hu, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry

CDR Dennis J. Vandenberg, USN (Ret.), CTP
Adjunct Professor of Mathematics

Math inspires critical thinking, applies to real life management problems, and can helps students be more effective leaders. I like to make sure my students know that math isn’t just for classrooms, but has a place in the real world job market. If someone is motivated and committed, they can do anything they want with a degree in math.

Department Contact


Br. Jesus Alonso, C.S.C., Ph.D.
Chair, Division of Natural Sciences
Vice President for Strategic Initiatives
jalonso@hcc-nd.edu
574-239-8366